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AP-NORC Poll: Voters interested, not excited about election
ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) - Mary Heintzelman shakes her head in disgust over the presidential election. "I don't think we have a candidate that's really suitable to be president in either party," says Heintzelman, an administrative assistant from Whitehall, Pennsylvania. Her son suggests she write in a candidate when she votes in November, but the 68-year-old says despondently, "I don't even know who to write in." Heintzelman is hardly alone in her angst over the prospect of a November matchup between presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump and likely Democratic pick Hillary Clinton. While 65 percent of Americans say they're interested in the White House race, just 23 percent say they're excited as the presidential contest shifts from the primaries to the general election, according to a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.


AP-NORC Poll finds bare confidence in government, elections
WASHINGTON (AP) - Few Americans have much confidence in the U.S. political system, the government in general, or in either political party. Most say they're interested in the 2016 presidential election, but they also feel frustrated, helpless and even angry with the way the election is going, a poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows. Democrats and Republicans alike feel down in the dumps about the election and about the political system in general. Some things to know about Americans' opinions on their government and the political system from the AP-NORC poll: LITTLE CONFIDENCE IN GOVERNMENT Few Americans have a lot of confidence in any of the branches of the government.


In business and politics, Trump stokes internal rivalries
WASHINGTON (AP) - When Donald Trump acquired a pair of Atlantic City casinos in the mid-1980s, he pitted his managers against each other in a ferocious competition over everything from booking entertainers to attracting high-rolling gamblers. That one of those managers was his wife, Ivana Trump, didn't earn her any slack. "His tactic there, as our success surpassed the Castle's in 1987, was to shove the Plaza's performance in Ivana's face, like a mirror, holding it up for her to see the reflection of a less than successful manager," John O'Donnell, Ivana Trump's rival in the casino wars, wrote in a 1991 book.


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11 hit by lightning in a Paris park; 8 of them children
PARIS (AP) - A Paris fire service spokesman says 11 people including eight children have been hit by lightning in a Paris park after a sudden spring storm overtook a child's birthday party. The victims had sought shelter Saturday under a tree at Park Monceau, a popular weekend hangout for well-to-do families in Paris. Spokesman Eric Moulin says six of those electrocuted were seriously injured, including four children and two adults - and four of them were in life-threatening condition. He said a further five people were slightly injured, including four children and another adult.


Syria rebels under fire from IS militants, government troops
BEIRUT (AP) - Islamic State militants entered a major Syrian opposition stronghold in the country's north on Saturday, clashing with rebels on the edges of the town as the extremist group builds on its most significant advance near the Turkish border in two years - even as it loses ground elsewhere in the country and in neighboring Iraq. The town of Marea, just north of Aleppo city, has long been considered a bastion of relatively moderate Syrian revolutionary forces fighting to topple Assad. The IS assault underlined the weakness of the groups fighting under the loose banner of the so-called Free Syrian Army that have been struggling to survive.


AP Analysis: Hopes for peace dim with new Taliban leader
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - Afghanistan's government has offered the new Taliban leader a choice: make peace or face the same fate as his predecessor, killed in a U.S. drone strike last week. But Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada is a hard-liner who has used his religious credentials to justify the Taliban insurgency that has killed or wounded tens of thousands of Afghan civilians as a "holy war" and his succession has inspired little hope for an end to the bloodshed. For many Taliban fighters, the movement's leadership lost Islamic legitimacy last year, when it emerged that its founder, one-eyed Mullah Mohammad Omar, had been dead for years and that his deputy, a wealthy drug smuggler named Mullah Akhtar Mansour, had been running the war in his name.


Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson rams whalers for a living
PARIS (AP) - He's a fugitive on Interpol's Red List and a marine vigilante who's done jail time for extradition requests. Yet to many, he's also a heroic marine conservationist who risks his life and those of his crew to save countless endangered whales, turtles, dolphins and sharks from slaughter. Love him or loathe him, Paul Watson, the 65-year-old, silver-haired founder of Sea Shepherd and co-founder of Greenpeace is now a celebrity because of his job: ramming whaling boats for a living. Watson has a hit U.S. reality TV series, "Whale Wars," that has aired on the Discovery Channel since 2008 about his organization's fight against Japanese whalers.


UN health agency rejects call to postpone Rio Olympics
BERLIN (AP) - The World Health Organization says there is "no public health justification" for postponing or canceling the Rio Summer Olympics because of the Zika outbreak in Brazil. The assessment, in a statement early Saturday, came a day after 150 health experts issued an open letter to the U.N. health agency calling for the games to be delayed or relocated "in the name of public health." Friday's letter cited recent scientific evidence that the Zika virus causes severe birth defects , most notably babies born with abnormally small heads. In adults, it can cause neurological problems, including a rare syndrome that can be fatal or result in temporary paralysis.


Death on Everest leads to risky effort to recover bodies
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) - The mountain is speckled with corpses. Nearly 300 people have died on Mount Everest in the century or so since climbers have been trying to reach its summit. At least 100 of them are still on the mountain, perhaps 200. Most of the bodies are hidden in deep crevasses or covered by snow and ice, but some are visible to every climber who passes by, landmarks in heavy plastic climbing boots and colorful parkas that fade a little more every year. The most famous corpses get nicknames - "Green Boots," ''Sleeping Beauty," ''The German" - becoming warnings of what can go wrong on the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak, even as they become part of the mountain's gallows humor.


Expecting worst, holiday travelers find fast airport lines
ATLANTA (AP) - Fast moving airport security lines at the start of the Memorial Day weekend could bode well for return travelers Monday. Travelers reported moving quickly through airport checkpoints Friday after authorities opened extra screening lanes and used bomb-sniffing dogs to give some passengers a break from removing their shoes. "Wow. I mean, wow," said Mike Saresky, who flew into Chicago from Philadelphia, where he breezed through airport security in 12 minutes and got to leave his shoes on. "I thought it was going to be a lot worse." The extra dogs were concentrated at the nation's largest airports, but they were not used for all screenings, meaning that many travelers still had to observe the usual procedures.

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